trending / - - - - - - - - -

trending / playstation 4 - ni no kuni - halo - wii u - bungie interview - ces top picks - radeon hd 7850 - woods pga tour

Thomas Was Alone (PS3) Review

/ May 7th, 2013 No Comments

TWA1

TWA1

Claire and Thomas Fording a Stream

Thomas Was Alone is a title for PS3 and PlayStation Vita. Developed by Mike Bithell, Thomas Was Alone was first created as a Flash browser game over two years ago. It has since gone on to evolve into a much more complicated title, one that you can now get your hands on on one of two different Sony consoles. Was it worth the wait?

Story

Thomas Was Alone is a strange beast, a mystery of game design. The game deals in duality with iconoclastic glee. A simple game with complex ideas, an easily “pick-upable” concept that contains a not-easily-dropped philosophy at its core. Basically, a platformer with brains, and most shockingly, heart.

When the game starts up, you find yourself staring at a little orange rectangle in a small space cut out from a black background, a deceptively plain vista. Then, comedian Danny Wallace’s mummy-tomb dry narration cuts in to tell you all about this bitty quadrilateral. His thoughts, his hopes and dreams, the quirky observations he’s making inside of his four-sided head. But most importantly, the snarky narrator informs us that “Thomas was alone.” Thomas is a rectangle, and Thomas can jump, and is inside a computer. In fact, he is a computer – he’s an AI, taking his first steps toward cognizance. He’s excited and scared and curious about the wide world spreading out before him. He wants to know why the world is challenging him, why it’s teaching him new platforming techniques just as things get harder. His commentary on the tried and true platform genre tropes is as refreshing as it is cheeky, and it adds a level of meta commentary to unquestioned video game cliches with a Bioshock 1 level of sharpness.

The world itself does seem to be challenging Thomas – the landscape shifts, forms spikes, spills toxic water in great lakes. Just when Thomas begins to reach the end of what he’s capable of as a mere jumping rectangle, we learn another interesting tidbit – Thomas is, in fact, NOT alone. There are other incipient A.I. rectangles (and squares), in different sizes, shapes, and colors, and they all come with their platforming ability. They have names, and personalities (as the narrator informs us), with their own observations about the strange world they’ve been thrust into. Claire, a big fat blue square, believes her ability to survive and float in water qualifies as a super-power, and her endearing inner monologue reads like Batman crossed with a Powerpuff Girl. An entire plethora of characters keep joining the story, each bringing their own flavor to the proceedings, each of them voiced by a limber and perfectly cast Danny Wallace.

Eventually a predator appears in the form of an angry pixel cloud from hell, and the 2D heroes must face not only their own mortality, but the tentative family they’ve built. A tale of awakening artificial intelligence and the need for companionship unfolds, one that is way deeper than it has any right to be.

Gameplay

TWA2

Rectangles, ASSEMBLE!

Thomas Was Alone is through-and-through a platformer, in the style of the oldest of schools. You jump. You traverse. You avoid pitfalls and water and moving spikes, perfecting your timing as you battle up the learning curve.

The trick, and the innovation of the game, is in how it gives you more than one character to move forward. Taking turns with the bump of a shoulder button, you learn to use each character’s special abilities to push the others forward, overlapping strength to cover weaknesses. When short Chris can’t make a jump, you can move Thomas into position as an impromptu step, or move Laura (who is essentially a living trampoline) into a spot where Chris can bounce off of her into a higher ledge. Claire can ferry other rectangles across water on her back, but she can’t fit through small passages or jump worth a damn. Sarah (besides being nutter-butters crazy), can double jump to new heights, and James is affected by gravity the opposite way as everyone else.

What’s best about the gameplay is that though it starts as a platformer, the plethora of characters and your options between them actually slowly morphs everything into a dastardly tricky puzzle game. No complaint – Thomas Was Alone is the great kind of puzzle game that makes your mind feel wonky, like it’s bending in new shapes to solve the problems ahead.

Graphics

The graphics seem simple, at first. The characters, though fully realized by the narration, are little more than single-colored rectangles. The background is plain, cut out of inky, featureless blackness. But the longer you play, the more you begin to notice the details – the way every level is lit on a two-dimensional plain from only one direction, so that every shape cuts long shadows across the landscape that move dynamically. The softly swaying shapes in the background, the fine edges on everything.

The graphics are never going to displace something like the vistas of FarCry 3, but they are without a doubt charming. There’s something to be said about an uncomplicated concept elegantly executed.

Sound

Bouncing Toward Death

Bouncing Toward Death

Thomas Was Alone’s strongest feature is without a doubt its sound – starting with the narration. It’s hard to believe that rectangles and squares could be emotionally realized characters, but the well-written narration turns the trick nicely. Funny without being pithy, honest without being stuffy, Bithel’s script works wonders. Performed by Wallace (known for his turn as the voice behind spiky Brit “Shaun Hasting” in Assassin’s Creed), the narration ends up being half the fun of the game.

The music, crafted by BAFTA nominated composer David Housden, is dreamy and weirdly enjoyable. It feels like a strange alchemy of sounds, the Little Big Planet soundtrack by way of Daft Punk. It provides a perfect counterpoint to the narration in crafting a surreal atmosphere of discovery and reflection, mirroring the AI characters journey to self-discovery.

Conclusion

Thomas Was Alone is an excellent concept with wonderful execution, a puzzle game that makes you feel and a heart-rending story that makes you think logically.

Thomas Was Alone is a success. Do yourself a favor, and check it out.

THOMAS WAS ALONE (PS3) REVIEW

Gaming Illustrated RATING

Overall90%

Gameplay9

Platforming chocolate and puzzle peanut butter, slammed together and delicious.

Graphics8

Elegant and stylish, executed well, but no powerhouse.

Sound10

Sublime. Evocative of thought and discovery, and the narration's hilarious.

Story9

Surprising tugging of the heartstrings, and a master course in characterization.


A copy of this title was provided for the purpose of this review.

B.C. Johnson
Part-time swashbuckler and full-time writer, B.C. Johnson lives in Southern California and yet somehow is terrible at surfing or saying "whoa." His first published novel, Deadgirl, came out this year and is available for Kindle, Nook, and even old dusty paperback. When he's not writing or playing video games, he can be found writing about playing video games and occasionally sleeping.
B.C. Johnson

Latest posts by B.C. Johnson (see all)

tags: ,

Related Posts

Tomb Raider: The Ten Thousand Immortals Review

Tomb Raider: The Ten Thousand Immortals Book Review

Oct 30th, 2014No Comments

The Legend of Korra

The Legend of Korra (PS4) Review

Oct 29th, 2014No Comments

FIFA 15 Review

FIFA 15 (Xbox One) Review

Oct 20th, 2014No Comments

Fenix Rage

Fenix Rage (PC) Review

Oct 17th, 2014No Comments

Top Articles

THOMAS WAS ALONE (PS3) REVIEW

Gaming Illustrated RATING

Overall90%

Gameplay9

Platforming chocolate and puzzle peanut butter, slammed together and delicious.

Graphics8

Elegant and stylish, executed well, but no powerhouse.

Sound10

Sublime. Evocative of thought and discovery, and the narration's hilarious.

Story9

Surprising tugging of the heartstrings, and a master course in characterization.

Tomb Raider: The Ten Thousand Immortals Book Review Oct 30th, 2014 at 9:00

The Legend of Korra (PS4) Review Oct 29th, 2014 at 7:00

FIFA 15 (Xbox One) Review Oct 20th, 2014 at 9:00

Fenix Rage (PC) Review Oct 17th, 2014 at 9:00

Skylanders: Trap Team (Xbox One) Review Oct 13th, 2014 at 8:03

Wasteland 2 (PC) Review Oct 9th, 2014 at 8:00

Murasaki Baby (PS Vita) Review Oct 8th, 2014 at 8:02

The Vanishing of Ethan Carter (PC) Review Oct 7th, 2014 at 9:00

Sherlock Holmes: Crimes & Punishments (PS4) Review Oct 6th, 2014 at 9:00

Persona 4 Arena Ultimax (PS3) Review Sep 29th, 2014 at 9:00